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doctor_knight 80 ( +1 | -1 )
Creating an Opening Repetoire I have been playing chess for a while now (never as serious as tournaments) and I'm now starting to get alot more serious about it and am trying to come up with an opening repetiore. I used to always use classical king pawn openings. I now use the colle system as white and the dragon sicilian and dutch defenses as black. I don't really think these are exactly the right openings for me.

Can anyone give me suggestions of openings to try. I'm quite a technical person and I like good piece activity. I also like somewhat calm positions. Basically positions with good piece activity that are not too sharp. I also like more classical style openings than modern. I'm more of a direct person.

Maybe someone could give me suggestions based on this.
dysfl 29 ( +1 | -1 )
Try modern defense as black It has 'modern' in its name, but it is pretty positional and calm system. I'm using it now and the result is reliable, after initial period of trying many things.

In my own experience, this defense will make a calm opening if neither side is too aggressive. It can be used against almost anything.
ccmcacollister 404 ( +1 | -1 )
Thoughts ... . doctor_knight there are many good ways for you to go. So there are just some thoughts I had on it, since most here somewhat fit together as a package in terms of many of their goals, tactical concepts, positional factors and type of pawn play aor somewhat structure.
***
Black: You might try a Gruenfeld Defense, if you dont mind playing against the Exchange Variation of WT, which has a bit of the hypermodern feel to it. But the other variations have a more classical feel to me. If you do mind the Exch.Var too much, perhaps a Slav Defense would be more to your taste, as more classical feeling, yet activity, etc. And it would have positions of similarity to an e4 defense I'd suggest to you. That being the Caro-Kann.
It has more activity and tactics than many people give it credit for, particularly for BL's minor pieces. Both the Classical Var with e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 de4 4.Ne4 Bf5 and the var 4.Ne4 Nf6 !? 5.Nxf6+ gxf6 ! (! meaning BEST, not meaning a Winning response. 5....exf6 is reputedly difficult as BL). Both these variations yield good activity and minor piece play for BL. Bob Curry, a 2300ish ccm in I knew from APCT used the latter variation as his mainstay with (obviously) quite good results. And it is a line that can be studied and broken down into an orderly and systematic system of play and goals as BL, once you understand it. If you preferred a bit quieter line then 4.Ne4 Nd7 is, and a Karpov favorite. (watch trap 5.Qe2!? Ngf6?? 6.Nd6+#mate!! ... where instead 5...Ndf6 is the usual reply to Qe2; a trappy but somewhat playable line for WT)
Another positionally related opening is the Scandinavian aka Center Counter Defense of 1.e4 d5 2.ed5 that could be easily learned for a back-up opening to your Caro.
********WHITE:
As WT you are playing d4 and Colle. You could easily learn a Stonewall Attack from there which would use your Dutch knowlege as well, as it is near a ...d5 Dutch reversed. And for an alternative, Bird's Opening 1.f4 would be a natural as a back-up to your 1.d4. The Stonewall must be played properly tho, and then quite often yields good K-side attacking for WT. But tends to be rather closed up,and if BL makes it thru the attack your endgame is probably not much. So it may not do well vs higher rated players.
A good active opening that probably few have seen is a Bf4 Queens Gambit (Declined).
{However they might play QGA-But your Slav/Caro understanding can help there.} 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Be7 4.Bf4 Nf6 is one move order, and WT goes on to play e3/Nc3/probably Qc2 and then castles o-o-o to attack vs BL's ...o-o. I've played it before in Postal Chess, and have had good tactics,and a nice sacraficial win. But i am really an e4 guy usually. Or hypermodern with such as 1.g3 (a.k.a. "The BOGG Opening", around here :))
...
Another consideration might be a Versov Opening d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5
****
From what you say you desire in openings, I would believe that the Dragon is definately NOT what you are lookking for. It is overly sharp, (if WT knows his stuff), than you want because in it one bad or non-best move can Often lose for BL. I played it in Master/Expert level games in Postal, and theory could change significantly 2 or 3 times During One Game!
You really have to be a specialist and perpetual student of it to ever take that opening to the higher levels, IMO. Nor does another Sicilian seem right, tho you could try to back down a notch to a less sharp one. Like Some Scheveningen Vars or 4-Knights Sicilian (...e6/....Nf6/,,,Bb4)]. If you really want a Sicilian. Not Najdorf.
*****
Hope any here might help. I have a friend who I think has similar stylistic & play considerations ... and he did well changing to the Caro from more Classical e4 e5 lines. Tho his other study habits were probably more to attribute the improvement to, I do believe he just Enjoys it better as BL, since one of his primary objectives
was to obtain early minor piece play without having to remain fixated on his ...e5 pawn for half dozen(s) moves, and upon trying to get in the move...d5. So why not just do it on Move #2 , and still get piece play ! :))
***
}8-)
doctor_knight 70 ( +1 | -1 )
thanks Thank you for your input. I greatly appreciate it. I knew that I wasn't playing the right openings, but I didn't know where to start. I was just playing openings I knew something about.

One thing I forgot to say is that I just started using the dutch and dragon sicilian. I used to use the KID and french, but again, I don't think these are right for me.

The way I really like to play is to wear out the enemy. Even if I had an attack, I would feel more comfortable using this threat to gain more material and gain an endgame advantage. I think this knowledge might also help anyone in recomending openings to me.

Again, thank you very much for the suggestions so far.
nottop 185 ( +1 | -1 )
openings For white I suggest you simply follow main lines. This is a lot of extra work. But systems like the Colle attack and King's Indian Attack will not work at a cerain level. I realize the enchantment aspect of those systems. You will likely not get a bad game. You will not run into other's prepared analysis. The systems are not hard to learn. So at a certain level, these are not bad choices.
But as you reach higher you will find that your opponents are better and can find fairly easy and known ways of equalizing.
Eventually you will play the main lines. Not that there aren't choices even there -
for instance you might decide you prefer to play regular white lines of the Ruy Lopez or regular white lines of the Scotch.
Against the Naijdorf you might prefer the English Attack - or you might prefer an equally good system. Who knows what is better?
But all of these are main lines.

As for black, I suggest varying from the Dutch. I'm not sure which you might prefer. The Grunfeld is sound and might suit your preferences as to piece play. I like the King's Indian. And I never seem to obtain any advantage against the Nimzo (although I don't like to play it as black).
If you suspect you ever might be playing against a computer aided opponent - then I suggest the Benko gambit. (watch the moves and laugh).

Against e4 I strongly recommend the Sveshnikov Sicilian. I've been playing it for many years and have never lost with it - and have never even obtained a difficult game with it. It's easy to play you have the right attitude.

At high iccf levels my opponents have been avoiding the main lines of the Sveshnikov and you will also then learn how to deal with all the avoidance schemes.

Good luck


peppe_l 142 ( +1 | -1 )
Hmm But aren't some of the suggested openings rather sharp and modern?

How about...

1.d4 followed by relatively quiet main lines - good chances to stay far from complex, theoretical stuff. If you want to pick a "role model", I suggest Karpov. Good, annotated game collection is the way to go.

As Black, classical openings like QGD, 1...e5 etc. Or maybe Nimzo/QID, French etc. Not as "cool" as sharp Sicilians but very sound and certainly easier to understand (no point in playing too complex openings).

Don't limit your play too much, though. Any strong chess player has to be good at all styles. For example you cannot "specialize" on classical positions only, because regardless of your opening choices there will be games where you must know how to play "modern" positions as well.

Overall, IMHO if you want to develop your skills as a chess player, focus on tactics, endgames, middlegame strategy and basic opening principles. Until you reach very high level, openings aren't so important and spending lots of time for studying them is more or less waste of time.

I know lots of chess players say "but if I have no clue of theory, I cannot get past the opening" - but such early losses are usually a result of poor tactical/positional skills. Eg miss a two-move threat, then say "had I known theory..." :-) It's better to learn some tactics...
doctor_knight 166 ( +1 | -1 )
thanks again I know all this about improving middle game and endgame skills. I've definately improved my middlegame skills considerably. I know the theory well and now I just need practice. I'm one of the top math students at my school and as I said, a very technical person, so chess theory come easily to me. I just need to practice. I am currently doing endgame study too (I've already done some endgame study before this). I know may rating here doesn't reflect my knowledge, but I have never been really serious about gameknot and my rating here. As I said, now I really just need practice.

I'm mainly lacking in opening skills so I want to develop a repetiore so I can stop worrying about the opening so much. Once I learn the openings that I like, I won't have to spend near as much time studying openings (hopefully no more time). I also don't think I'm aiming to become a grandmaster so I don't think I'll have to stay up on the theory as much anyway.

What I really need is for people to give me recommendations (which you have all kindly done).

I think I might look into the caro-kann and slav as black. I'm still not sure about what to play as white though I think I like queen pawn openings.

Another thing I think I should ask is how do you deal with hypermodern openings (I don't mean how are you supposed to deal with them, but how do you personally deal with them)?

Also if anyone has any suggestions about good opening literature (especially about the above openings) then I would be happy for the input.

Thanks again.
peppe_l 54 ( +1 | -1 )
I play Caro-Kann and Slav as Black. This kind of repertoire is nice because it's quite safe and allows me to use "similar" systems vs other moves too, eg 1.c4/1.Nf3/1.g3. If you like positional play, 1.d4 may be better choice than 1.e4. The English opening is one option, too.

Books...I have "The Slav" by Matthew Sadler. It's very instructive and easy to read (teaches the opening via example games). Then maybe "Starting Out: Caro-Kann" by Joe Gallagher. Stay far from database dumps. Memorizing lots of lines is not going to help...
doctor_knight 16 ( +1 | -1 )
have you heard of a book by Andrew Soltis about using the caro-kann and slav as black? I saw it in the bookstore the other day but I didn't look into it.
wschmidt 40 ( +1 | -1 )
If you're talking about... "A Black Defensive System for the Rest of Your Career" I don't recommend it. Unless it's a new, updated, enlarged and much improved book it's very sketchy and will leave you with a lot of unanswered questions. Soltis has contributed a lot of good books to American chess literature bit his reputation as an author of opening books is poor and probably justifiably so. I tried using BDS several years ago and gave up in frustration. ws
titanium 102 ( +1 | -1 )
Creating an opening repertoire. "Basically positions with good piece activity that are not too sharp."

I think that the petrov fits that description perfectly. a typical line would go something like this: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d4 d5 6.Bd3 Bd6 7.0-0 0-0 8.c4 c6 etc.

Still, I think the caro-kann would also be an excellent choice and it is a good companion to the slav indeed.

As white I would expect your Colle to do just fine. I wouldn't be to worried about the fact that this isn't a main line. It's a very sound opening and offers plenty of play. I.M.O main lines are overrated anyway. Obviously they are main lines for a reason but as long as your opening is sound you'll do fine.

I think the modern or stonewall would less suit your style.
I would definetly stay away from the sveshnikov. It's far from a bad opening, but often higly complex and tactical and it regularly leads to rather strange positions (nothing like classical openings).

Good luck with it!
schnarre 47 ( +1 | -1 )
Hmmnn... For White, I usually recommend the Torre Attack 1. d4, 2. Nf3, 3. Bg5. Tenacious in attack, solid in defense, flexible yet very forgiving. Smith & Hall's "Opening Systems for Competetive Chess Players" is an easy reading.

For Black, I would recommend the Caro-Kann as well! Vs. 1. d4 perhaps the Tartakower defense (since you prefer Classical lines). All three of these openings are covered in the afore-mentioned book. The Tarrasch Defense 1. d4 d5, 2. c4 e6, 3. Nc3 c5 would also be worth a look!
ry6n 128 ( +1 | -1 )
Tactics?? I have looked your rating and you say that you have a good grasp of the middlegame, if that was so your rating would be around the 1300 - 1600 mark at least. I feel it would be best for you to study tactics and strategy before openings (Winning Chess Tactics - seirawan). Just pick ONE opening at white (AND STICK WITH IT!!!!) and 1 or 2 as black depeding on your defense. Maybe the Petroff or Sicilian Najdorf (slow and solid) as black and if you like slow for white I would try a queen pawn opening (Forget 1. e4). I prefer more attacking chess so I will leave that recommedation to someone else. www.jeremysilman.com has smoe good discussions on this topic too...

How to learn an opening:
-> www.chessville.com

Opening Repertoire for Attacking Players:
-> www.chessville.com

Opening Repertoire for Positional Players:
-> www.chessville.com

Download Tactical Exercises:
-> www.chessville.com

Cheers and Good Luck
Ryon.
hildanknight 144 ( +1 | -1 )
An interesting question... My style seems to be somewhat similar to your's doctor_knight. (Is it because we are both "knights"??) I like to play for strategic advantages and favourable endgames - and tend to lose when it comes to tactics. My rating is "C" class - so perhaps you can look into my opening reportoire. (Doctor can learn some, the experts can give advice)

As White I usually play 1 e4, and what I play depends on Black's responses.

Against the Sicilian I tend to play the Grand Prix. A book says it is a very dangerous system for Black if he does not know how to deal with it. However, unlike the lines in the book (which concentrate on attacking the King), my Grand Prix games, after 2 Nc3 and 3 f4, tend to feature the move Bb5 followed by trying to control d4 (and advance d4 when favourable).

Against the Caro-Kann and French, I used to play Exchange variations. I even used to believe that 1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 exd5 cxd5 4 Bb5+ refuted the Caro-Kann. However, I now tend to play the Advance variations which close the position and allow me to apply what I have learnt from IM Jeremy Silman's book The Amatuer's Mind.

Against 1...e5, I have a large range of choices. I occasionally play the King's Gambit, though not as often as I used to. After 2 Nf3 Nc6, I play (in order of frequency) the Ruy Lopez, Guicco Piano or Scotch.

Hope this helps doctor_knight with his reportoire AND the experts can help me with mine.
hildanknight 144 ( +1 | -1 )
An interesting question... My style seems to be somewhat similar to your's doctor_knight. (Is it because we are both "knights"??) I like to play for strategic advantages and favourable endgames - and tend to lose when it comes to tactics. My rating is "C" class - so perhaps you can look into my opening reportoire. (Doctor can learn some, the experts can give advice)

As White I usually play 1 e4, and what I play depends on Black's responses.

Against the Sicilian I tend to play the Grand Prix. A book says it is a very dangerous system for Black if he does not know how to deal with it. However, unlike the lines in the book (which concentrate on attacking the King), my Grand Prix games, after 2 Nc3 and 3 f4, tend to feature the move Bb5 followed by trying to control d4 (and advance d4 when favourable).

Against the Caro-Kann and French, I used to play Exchange variations. I even used to believe that 1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 exd5 cxd5 4 Bb5+ refuted the Caro-Kann. However, I now tend to play the Advance variations which close the position and allow me to apply what I have learnt from IM Jeremy Silman's book The Amatuer's Mind.

Against 1...e5, I have a large range of choices. I occasionally play the King's Gambit, though not as often as I used to. After 2 Nf3 Nc6, I play (in order of frequency) the Ruy Lopez, Guicco Piano or Scotch.

Hope this helps doctor_knight with his reportoire AND the experts can help me with mine.
doctor_knight 117 ( +1 | -1 )
I think that ry6n is not a particularly careful reader. I said that my rating did not reflect my tactical and positional understanding. As I said before, I don't play gameknot games very seriously, far less seriously than OTB. I'm mainly using it to stay fresh in my chessgame. I don't want to get rusty so I play here. I may spend a couple of minutes on each move, but I don't trouble myself too much with working out the various tactical considerations. I'm a fulltime high school student taking a college english class and trying to ace the SAT. I'm working to win state in tennis this year also and I've been trying to get good at classical guitar, so I'm a pretty worn out person. If I devoted my energy to succeeding at gameknot, I don't think I would have the mental energy to move on in my real life.

Just so you know, I have been studying the middlegame and have seriously begun to study more endgame material so I definately have not neglected these studies. I'm trying to get my openings solid so I can stop worrying about it and work on more important points, but I've lost too many games because I was playing out of character (a result of my opening repetoire).
greenrat777 84 ( +1 | -1 )
chess openings if white opens 1 d2 d4 u might want 2 look at playing the nimzo indian.named after aron nimzowitsh 1880 1935.1 d2d4 kn g8 f6 2 c2c4 e7 e6 3 kn b1 c3 b f1 b4.some players will try and block this by moving the pawn a2 a3.when they do that i just play the queens indian instead. this is how the black players move in the queens indian.1 g8 f6 2 e7 e6 3 b7 b6 4c8 b7 5 f8 e7 6 e8g8.i lke the nimzo indian but some players try and block it as i said earlier.some times after 1 d2 d4 they will make some moves that may b u dont know how 2 move against.so i just play the queens indian as it seems 2 work against most stuff other players send your way.the nimzo indian and queens indian r simular in some ways so u can switch over 2 the queens indian if u have 2 on move 3.
peppe_l 106 ( +1 | -1 )
Re: Caro-Kann & Slav "Just so you know, I have been studying the middlegame and have seriously begun to study more endgame material so I definately have not neglected these studies. I'm trying to get my openings solid so I can stop worrying about it and work on more important points, but I've lost too many games because I was playing out of character (a result of my opening repetoire)."

Are you sure opening repertoire is the way to go? For example I (usually) play "out of character" if I am supposed to attack or if the position is too tactical. But that's because my attacking/tactics skills aren't good enough. Personally, I have found out the best way to stop worrying about openings is to stop worrying about openings :-)

Anyway, I feel Caro-Kann/Slav "repertoire" has served me well. Both openings are safe & sound, no need to memorize zillions of lines from ECO. At least on my level spotting the most typical traps & threats (again, no need to learn theory if you know where to look, eg Slav - make sure d5 & b7 are safe before moving Bc8) is enough.
ionadowman 216 ( +1 | -1 )
An opening repertoire There's been some interesting advice given among your respondents, doctor_knight, but I wonder if it can't get a little bit confusing? You seem to like a 'classical' style of game, with plenty of piece play, by which I infer you don't particularly want the pawns to interfere too much in the play.
That sounds rather like the Scotch Game or possibly Scotch and Goring Gambits, to me.
[1.e4 e5; 2.Nf3 Nc6; 2.d4...] Against the Sicilian, why not the Morra gambit? Against the French, the Tarrasch line [3.Nd2]; oppose the Caro Kann with 2.Nc3, and the Pirc/Modern with the centre pawns then both Knights. The gambits mentioned aren't the quick blitz so much as quick piece development and initiative, placing the enemy under early pressure. I agree with an earlier correspondent that the Torre Attack is a good alternate choice.
As Black, I hear that the Budapest is a line attracting a lot of interest: 1.d4 Nf6; 2.c4 e5!? Against e4, you might revive your forsaken French and play my personal favorite the Guimard Variation. [1.e4 e6; 2.d4 d5; 3.Nd2 Nc6] This aims for piece play, and an ...e5 break [tho' usually I delayed this rather more that the 'books' suggested]. After a couple of early disasters with this line I enjoyed great success with it as my stock reply to 3.Nd2 in OTB play. The fact is, I was (am) very fond of the Winawer, but found the Tarrasch far more popular among my opponents!
I also agree with someone's suggestion of the Benko Gambit: a fairly clear cut plan of action, with Q-side piece play emerging from the flank of a sound and good pawn skeleton.
I would not recommend openings that require lots of 'book' learning, like the Najdorf Sicilian, The Slav or Semi-Slav of the QGD, the Grunfeld , Modern Benoni (other than the Benko Gambit), Pirc aor King's Indian... at least, not yet. If you feel you want to try these defences, however, I would strongly suggest you play the King's Indian Attack as well in order to become thoroughly steeped in the kinds a game that can develop from these formations.
Hope I've helped rather than hindered...Ion
velvetvelour 185 ( +1 | -1 )
Although his rating seems to require a mastery of elementary tactics and blunder-proofing one's moves, as far as recommendations for his choice of play:

Against 1) d4: I think the Tarrasch Defence would suit him nicely. It gives black exactly what he claims to like: good piece activity, active play, and the positions aren't as wild and wooly as many Q-pawn defences, and white's initiative isn't as obvious. It's primary drawback is an isolated Q-pawn for black, however, it's yet to be proven that it's that much of a liability in this opening, considering its perks. Back-up defence for d4: Lasker's Defence of the Queen's Gambit Declined, or the Cambridge Springs Defence, which both spring from similar moves by white. When you're ready for hypermodern openings, then you should experiment with the King's Indian, as other more complicated, dynamic openings (Benoni, Grunfeld, Old Indian, Pirc) have similar pawn structures and thematic ideas

Agsinst 1) e4: If you truly dislike facing a tactical initiative from white than the Dragon, in any form, is totally the wrong opening. In keeping in Sicilian territory, the Four Knights variation is preferable, as it's an older system, less theoretical, which follows those 'classical' rules. Otherwise maybe something like the Caro-Kann would be to your liking, either the 4) ... Nd7 Steinitz variation or the 4) ... Nf6 Bronstein-Larsen variation if you want to test your feel for a "dynamic" position. Of course, there's old reliable in 1) ... e5, with a pet line in reserve for the King's Gambit, the Guicco Pianno, the Ruy Lopez, and other openings springing from the double K-pawn well. Many teachers would advocate ...e5 just to give you a feel for the different sort of openings that arise, it's very much a "classical" course education wise.
ionadowman 124 ( +1 | -1 )
Opening repertoire I didn't think of the Tarrasch line against 1.d4! A good idea (and it doesn't require as miuch cooperation from yr opponents as does the Cambridge Springs...) Velvetvelour speaks of the resulting isolani for Black as a drawback, but if you like active piece play, you might be inclined to welcome this! That's the trade-off. The isolani is not a total liability, and while it lives, it will support the useful outpost square e4 (and if need be c4) to help your pieces towards the enemy king.
I'm very dubious about the Caro-Kann (tho' I confess I've never played it as Black). It seems to me to require patience as White has a bit of an initiative for some time to come. Better for your purposes seems 1...e5, though what you do about the Ruy Lopez is hard to say! I played the Schliemann from time to time - sound enough tho' limited in scope. I like the Marshall a lot, but it required too much cooperation from one's opponent to get to it. Too many are bloodyminded enough to play the 'Anti-Marshall' [8.a4]. I would recommend instead the Siesta Variation, quite an aggressive line for Black, with plenty of play. Against the Guioco Piano, you can't go past the 2 Knights' Defence! Wonderful Opening. Try the Wilkes-Barre for plenty of action, but the 'main' lines are also a lot of fun.
schnarre 27 ( +1 | -1 )
hmmmnnn..... Sounds to me like our compatriot has quite a bit to select from now, as we've all put our 2 cents worth th help out. All that remains is for a repetoire fitting the player's style to reveal itself--experience should provide that.

Good luck in your endeavors & Happy Hunting!
e4e6 281 ( +1 | -1 )
Based on what I've read here, I think I have just the answer for you.

You say you want piece activity, but yet to wear out your opponent by threatening to win a pawn, get a won ending, etc. Here are a few possibilities with the pluses and minuses of each:

Against 1.e4:

Caro-Kann Defense - Slow, positional game, good for wearing out your opponents, various options for lines to play, so you don't have to play lines that lock in your pieces like you do in the French (i.e. avoid the Smyslov variation, 4...Nd7 against the main line). At the same time, it's constantly that "threat" to break open with say, ...c5. The only negative...there occasionally can be that true lack of piece play if white decides to go with certain systems, like say, the Fantasy Varitation (my favorite with White) where White maintains the double pawn center (e4 and d4).

Alternative: Ruy Lopez, Closed main line (7...d6). Allows for lots of piece play (especially in say, the Zaitsev, 9...Bb7). Biggest downfall, the amount of theory you have to know (King's Gambit, Scotch, Danish, Vienna, etc.)


Against 1...d4

English Defense - Excellent defense with plenty of piece play and that very strong bishop on b7 that White has to deal with. Only problem with it is you have to be willing to occasionally deal with a French Defense if you start off with 1...e6, or Owen's Defense if you start off with 1...b6, but against 1...e6, I get a French only occasionally. Biggest advantage, you can play this via 1...b6 against the English Opening also (via 1...b6, which annoys the living daylights out of "systematic" players that like to play 1.c4 and then no matter what Black does, 2.g3).

Against 1...c4

See "Against 1.d4"

Against 1...Nf3

A lot depends on whether you can deal with an occasional "Owen's Defense", if so, 1...b6. If not, probably a set-up similar to the Caro-Kann, with c6 and d5, plugging up the h1-a8 diagonal if White fienchettos should work fine.


White: Veresov

Whites gets lots of piece play with this unorthodox opening. I have played it for about 2-3 years with huge success (1.d4 d5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bg5 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.Bg5), scoring 10 wins, 2 draws, and 2 losses with the "Veresov Proper". Keep in mind that Black can play 3...e6, which White has nothing better than 4.e4 transposing to the French Defense, but as long as you know something about it, playing the White side shouldn't be that hard. Also have to deal with lines where Black doesn't play ...d5, such as transpositions to the Pirc and Modern. Also, must be willing to sacrifice sometimes....often times giving up the a2 pawn with your King being castled queenside. The c3-Knight often acts as a Key defender on either b1, blocking the Q away from your K on c1, or on d1, guarding b2 and other key squares around your king.
loreta 44 ( +1 | -1 )
Just mine Against 1. ... e4
-
Caro-Kann 1. ... c6
or... 1. ... e5 with intention to play f5!
As Calabrese gambit 1. e4 e5 2. Bcė f5!
As Latvian gambit 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 f5!
As Spielmann of Ruy: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5!
Last year i tried massively (in blitz) Rousseau gambit: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 f5!? BUT failed with it as it's difficult to play against 4. d3!
AND... if white goes for KG, then Falkbeer counter-gambit: 1. e4 e5 2. f4 d5!
-
Against 1. d4 and near to all other possible first moves (Exception only 1.g4 and some other 'strange' moves)
-
1. ... f5
--------
Simple but effective repertoire
daniele 7 ( +1 | -1 )
Giuoco piano This is the right way to write it.

Please use it and tell it your friends.
ionadowman 3 ( +1 | -1 )
Giuoco Piano Mea culpa: I misspelled it...Cheers,
Ion